Domestic Violence is not Beautiful

11/12/2017 § Leave a comment

 

Trinny Woodall is a former television presenter who was popular in the UK in the early 2000s. By the power of YouTube she has recently reinvented herself as a beauty guru, and has launched a cosmetics brand, called Trinny London.

 

Trinny Woodall is in a relationship with the millionaire advertising guru Charles Saatchi, who was famously photographed assaulting his then-wife Nigella Lawson outside a restaurant in London in 2013.

 

Charles Saatchi is also a shareholder in Trinny London, holding the third-largest proportion of shares after the venture capital wing of Unilever, and Woodall herself – as shown by the Trinny London listings held at Companies House.

 

This means that any woman who buys Trinny London products is giving money to a known domestic abuser.

 

The Trinny London brand is currently being promoted by:

 

The blogger and influencer Caroline Hirons, a beauty industry professional with twenty years experience, who has 181k followers on Instagram, and 138k subscribers to her YouTube  channel.

 

The Guardian, by the journalist Sali Hughes, whose Guardian column is read by tens of thousands of women every week, and by the fashion editor Hannah Marriot who commission’s Hughes’s column.

 

Plus Hanna Ibrahim at Good Housekeeping magazine,  Anna Hunter at Get the Gloss websiteFiona McKim at Woman and Home magazine, and a whole host of other newspapers, magazines and websites besides.

 

The annual Femicide Survey by the UK domestic violence charity Womens Aid found that nine out of ten women who were murdered in the UK in 2017 were killed by their partner or someone they knew. The same charity suggests that 1.3 million women were subject to domestic violence in the last year and that 4.3m women over the age of 16 have been subject to domestic violence at least once in their lives.

 

It is at best ironic, and more likely breathtakingly hypocritical, that Caroline Hirons supports womens refuges through her Give and MakeUp project on the one hand, and promotes a brand that will profit a known domestic abuser on the other.

 

It is at best ironic, and more likely breathtakingly hypocritical, that The Guardian newspaper should put a report about domestic violence on its front page the day after it publishes a column that speaks favourably of a brand that will profit a known domestic abuser.

 

It is at best ironic, and more likely breathtakingly hypocritical, that any publication that purports to be a womens publication should publish articles that speak favourably of a brand that will profit a known domestic abuser

 

I call on all of these publications and authors, and anyone else that is promoting the Trinny London brand, to do the following:

 

  1. Remove all current content promoting or discussing the Trinny London brand from your website, and other online channels.

 

  1. Issue a disclaimer condemning Trinny London and any brand that will profit domestic abusers

 

  1. Stop all coverage of the Trinny London brand unless and until Charles Saatchi ceases to be a shareholder.

 

 

As I see it, either you support women in the struggle against violence and abuse, or you support abusive men profiting from women’s interests. You can’t do both. I wonder which side of the argument beauty journalists and bloggers will fall on with the Trinny London brand?

 

 

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